If you listen to the media, you’d think the Democratic party is a failure, that it must now “reassess” it’s values. No. Quite the opposite; the party needs to reassert itself, continually, since it represents most of us.

This conclusion is reached by reason alone: In the last national election, the Democratic candidate and platform received the majority of the popular vote, despite encumbrances to suppress the vote. We can logically say; therefore, it represents the majority.

And thus, it follows the Affordable Care Act, support for Planned Parenthood, the Paris Climate Agreement, recognition of equal rights for gays, new environmental protection laws, and other acts initiated by or supported by the Obama administration, are also supported by the majority of Americans.

The present Republican majority in Congress, on the other hand, being “the winners,” from all reports, has an agenda based on negativity (as it had been during Mr. Obama’s presidency), since its laser beam is focused on eliminating every accomplishment of Mr. Obama and the Democrats. But a policy of destroying good policies already in place, is counter-productive. Haven’t Republican lawmakers learned from a failure of the Vietnam War: “We had to destroy the village to save it”?

Well, despite the unpopularity of Hillary Clinton’s personality with many voters, her policy values received the endorsement of the majority. The people would have even re-elected Mr. Obama if given the option.

If Obama “erred” in one way, it was by speaking with a soft voice while carrying a big stick. (Who else would have announced the death of Bin Laden in such soft and solemn tones?)

Our current president lies loudly with his bragging. Sure, he’s entertaining and a source of guaranteed revenue for the media, but frankly, his antics are becoming very tiring. Perhaps America’s cult of celebrity worship has reached an all-time low point with the election of Donald J. Trump. Wouldn’t we be better off with the “boring” Mrs. Clinton as president with her progressive policies? Most of America voted that way.

Carl Scheiman
Walpole